Vintage Fashion Tips




A Look at Vintage Halloween Costumes

dont-get-caught
vintage halloween costumes
Halloween is just around the corner. If you are a vintage shop owner this is most likely going to be your busiest month of the year. If it is not, then you are missing out. Don’t get in the mind-set that your unique collection is fashion forward. It might be to select few designers and hipsters, but to the rest of the population your store sales old clothes, like costumes.

With a few simple adjustments to your in-store marketing, or how you present your product, you just might be able to sell through all those old polyester pants and heavy poly-fabric dresses.  In an attempt to leave you with a little inspiration, take a look at the different vintage Halloween costumes from the past.

vintage halloween

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How do you use social media for your business?

social

So much of our motivation comes from the feedback that we constantly get from businesses around the world.

We would really like to know about your business, and how you use social media. Anything you can think of will be appreciated.
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A Look at Vintage Halloween Costumes

dont-get-caught
vintage halloween costumes
We are few days into the month of October and that means that Halloween is just around the corner. If you are a vintage shop owner this is most likely going to be your busiest month of the year. If it is not, then you are missing out. Don’t get in the mind-set that your unique collection is fashion forward. It might be to select few designers and hipsters, but to the rest of the population your store sales old clothes, like costumes.

With a few simple adjustments to your in-store marketing, or how you present your product, you just might be able to sell through all those old polyester pants and heavy poly-fabric dresses.  In an attempt to leave you with a little inspiration, take a look at the different vintage Halloween costumes from the past.

vintage halloween

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Think Outside the Box : How to Make a Difference Starting With Your Wardrobe

make a difference

Here’s the irony: fashion is short-lived while fabric and pollution are not.

After all of the inspiration, design, and excitement pass, the clothes remain. Heavy Flannel, Acid-washed denim, Break dancing pants. They’re out there still, in closets, thrift stores, and land fills. Eco-savvy fashion choices mean not only reducing post-consumer refuse, but also pre-consumer waste and pollution.

After its origins on the farm, forest, or oil field, each jacket spent some time morphing into its present form. What chemicals were used to grow it? Were the dyes safe? As more designers and manufacturers create with eco-concerns in mind, it’s easier to find satisfying answers. Through smart wardrobe management and consumer choices, you can cut down on closet clutter, support clean industry, and look fabulous.

The FAQs below provided by TreeHUgger will help you navigate all of the terminology and find the best ways to Make a Difference Starting With Your Wardrobe.

1.Shop with a plan

When you bring an article of clothing into your life, its kind of like adopting a dog or cat. That cute little number has to have a place in your wardrobe, and you’re agreeing to provide for and give it the longest possible life with you. Abandoning the impulse buy may sound boring, but how exciting is a closet full of stuff that doesn’t work? In the long run, knowing what you’re looking for before you shop will save time and eliminate clutter. You’ll get more use out of a piece that looks and feels great: What colors work for you? What fits work the best? How will the piece get along with everything else in the closet? If the answer to “Will I still want to wear this rhinestone-studded bustier in two years?” or “Can I eventually find a way to use it in a craft project?” is no, skip it

2. Love your duds

Whatever you’ve chosen, take good care of it. When you get home, change out of work gear and into your famous dressing gown or leisure suit. Don’t cook or check the tire pressure in clothes you want to wear in public. Learn how to sew a button back on, or how to coax a nimble friend into doing it for you. Get the name of a local tailor or seamstress for major repairs or alterations.

3. Don’t go dry

Though the industry has improved much since 1992, there is still a high likelihood that your trusty corner cleaner uses perc (tetrachloroethylene), a known carcinogen. See if there is a local green cleaner employing “wet cleaning” or liquid CO2 techniques. Many articles whose tags ask for the dry clean treatment can actually be hand washed, especially silk, wool and linen.

4. Buy vintage or used

People unload clothes for all types of reasons, and you know that adage about trash and treasure. From Oscar-worthy vintage dresses to Freecycled denim, you can likely find the piece you’re looking for second hand. You’ll be giving a cast-off garment a second life, and possibly supporting charitable work in the process. See Dust Factory for more.

5. Wash well

Washing wreaks the most havoc of all. It requires lots of water and energy, so only do it when you absolutely need to and have a full laundry load. Turn articles inside out and use the lowest temp possible. If you know you glowed all over a piece, make a thin salt paste and soak the affected fabric for a half hour before washing. Choose phosphate-free and biodegradable detergents and line dry as much as possible. Treat stains quickly with nontoxic removers. If you’re buying a new washing machine, look for one with an Energy Star label.

6.Wear organic

Though cotton is marketed as clean, fresh, and natural, conventional varieties are anything but. It takes a third of a pound of chemical fertilizers and pesticides to produce the cotton for one T-shirt! That means lots of direct, unhealthy exposure for farmers and nearby wildlife, and heaps of unnecessary pollution. Luckily, organic cotton is becoming easier and easier to find. As mega-stores get into the game, however, it’s important to stay vigilant about what organic means, so you know you’re really getting clean clothes. Also know that though the cotton may have been organic to start with, your T may be full of processing chemicals and metal-laden dyes. See below for more info on labeling and certification.

7. Find a re-construction

A re-construction garment used to be another or many other articles. Designers all over the globe have taken on this transformative challenge in recent years, with very wearable results. This means a one-of-a-kind look for you, a new life for old fabric, and a livelihood for maverick re-users. See Particle Clothing for More.

8.Approach new fabrics with skeptical enthusiasm

No doubt you’ve heard the hype around bamboo, soy, or even corn fabric. The idea of finding alternatives to petrochemical-based and conventionally grown options makes us all perk up and we see why many eco-conscious designers are excited about them. Bamboo, for instance, sounds great: it’s a fast-growing plant, not reliant on chemicals, and beautifully drapes the human form. Trouble is, bamboo plantations can displace native forests, and the harvesting and fiber processing are often polluting and unregulated. As with soy, corn, and Tencel (which comes from trees), the processing from plant to fabric is energy and resource intensive. For now, approach these as alternatives to poly, nylon, acrylic or conventional silk and await more info. As always, shop with a plan: don’t fill multiple shopping bags just because the labels say “eco.” Read more about fabric choices below.

9.Choose clothes that work for you

It’s hard to feel beautiful in your raw silk dress when it’s likely that children’s scalded hands were part of the production chain. Conventional clothing might not say it, but clothing made under fair-wage and labor practices will usually advertise it. SweatShop Watch and Behind The Label are good sources of info. See more resources below.

10.Don’t throw it all away

Finally, a stain, a tear, or changing fashion threaten to separate you from your favorite dress shirt. Don’t just abandon your old friend to the waste-stream! If the condition is perfectly good, you can always donate or Freecycle it (see below for donation resources).

DO MORE

 

1. Speak up

Tell your favorite boutique or department store that you want clean fabric or re-used options.

2.Get it re-made

Once you have a tailor or seamstress, take in last year’s clothes for an overhaul. That stained sweater could become a cardigan, and that too-tight dress, a skirt.

3.Swaporamarama

Get together with pals for fizzy drinks and a clothing swap. If it’s new to you, it’s new for your friends as well.

4. Activate

Join the Organic Consumers Association’s Clothes for a Change Campaign.

5.Make donating a snap

Planet Aid places bins in convenient places to make donating old wearables easy. Is it easy for people to donate in your community?

vintage clothing recycle

THE FACTS ABOUT RECYCLED CLOTHING

1. The average American throws away about 68 pounds of clothing and textiles per year.

2. 10% of all agricultural chemicals and 25% of insecticides in the U.S. are used to grow cotton.

3. It takes almost 1/3 of a pound of chemicals (pesticides and fertilizers) to grow enough cotton for just ONE T-shirt

4. Seven of the fifteen pesticides used on cotton are considered “possible”, “likely”, “probable”, or “known” human carcinogens (acephate, dichloropropene, diuron, fluometuron, pendimethalin, tribufos, and trifluralin) according to the US Environmental Protection Agency.

5. Some studies have shown that organic farmed soils have a better ability to absorb and retain carbon, which would be beneficial in the fight to reduce global warming.

6. Organically grown crops also use less fossil fuel than conventional crops, another benefit in the fight to reduce global warming.

7. Pesticides are suspected to be responsible the severe drop in honeybees, the increase in frogs with extra legs and eyes, and annual death of 67 million birds.

8. The U.S. textile “recycling industry” (which actually re-purposes rather than recycles), with some 2,000 companies, removes annually from the solid waste stream 2.5 billion pounds of post consumer textile product waste.

1.What makes clothing organic?

Organic clothing comes from all-natural materials (no synthetics like polyester or rayon) and there are no pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, rodenticides, radiation, or genetically modified organisms used when growing the cotton/hemp/linen, or whatever plant we’re talking about.

Organic certification is complicated. According to the Organic Trade Association, organic cotton is grown in 12 countries, with Turkey and the United States leading the pack. There are a number of certifying bodies around the globe including: Demeter (Europe), KRAV (Sweden), Naturland (Germany), SKAL (Netherlands), The Soil Association (England), The Japan Organic Cotton Association, The International Natural Textiles Association (Germany), the USDA, and more. The International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements (IFOAM) strives to create international standards, and certifies the certification schemes of individual nations.

The Institute for Market Ecology provides on-location certification on behalf of many of the organizations listed above, and according to the Organic Cotton Blog, is certifying Walmart’s and Sam’s Club cotton.

The Organic Trade Association has developed certification for fiber processing. What does this mean? Clothes certified organic will arrive having been processed, dyed, transported, etc. in the most non-toxic manner possible.

What are the various meanings of “sustainable” and “organic” clothing? Check out this informative examination from the Organic Clothing Blog. The Fiber and Fabrics section in general is a great place to learn about hemp, wool, bamboo… And the associated Lotus Organics Clothing, Fiber and Fashion glossary contains most of the fiber definitions you would ever need.

So now you know.

Seventies Fashion Revisited

70s vintage clothing designers

“Every generation laughs at the old fashions, but follows religiously the new.” Henry David Thoreau.

There are a few designers from the seventies that set the trends for decades to come.

These designers were cutting edge for their time and their creations and designs are still being used today by contemporary designers around the world. With the eighties moving by, the seventies is looking like it is going to be the next big thing in Vintage Clothing.

Let us take a look at some of the movers and shakers from this era:

Vintage Seventies Designers


Halston

Seventies fashion DesignersRoy Halston Frowick was a definitive designer of the seventies who created nearly every popular dress that you saw on the dance floor. His draped and free moving construction of his garments without buttons or zippers made them perfect for the dance floor. The halter and the shoulder style dress were hands down his most replicated pieces.  Halston designed for many of the celebrities back in the seventies and was one of the first major designers to license his name, making his clothes more accessible tot he masses.

 

Missoni

Misoni Zig Zag PatternItalian Fashion Designer Ottavio Missoni was best known for knitwear with their bold, bright space dyed weave patterns.The Missoni zig zag pattern knit is easily recognizable in today’s fashion. It is used on everything from scarves, caps, dresses and outerwear.

 

 

 

 

Diane von Furstenberg

Diane Von Von Furstenberg will most likely always be noted as the designer who invented the jersey wrap dress which soon became a wardrobe necessity. The Kimoni inspired wrap dress is Von Furstenberg trademark dress, she was influential to all dress designers establishing a standard for the ease and comfort in woman’s clothing for decades to come.

 

 

 

Thea Porter

seventies fashionThea Porter is a half English, half French clothing designer that was inspired by traveling the world when she was young. She translated her multi cultured ethnic experiences into her designs that inspired the bohemian look that was popular in the mid seventies. Her career as a designer began with her own extensive clothing collection and a middle eastern import store on the fashion streets of London. There she designed a number of different caftans, maxi dresses that were all very accessible and stylish.

 

 

 

Bill Gibb

seventies fashionBill Gibb was famous for mixing prints, textures and embellishments with ethnic, medieval, and romantic flare. This made Gibb a tremendous influence of the “hippie” style of clothing that became popular in the 70’s. Gibb was influenced by a close friend and artist/textile designer Kaffe Fassett who inspired the wild use of colors and patterns that you see in his designs.

 


These designers all left their mark on fashion for years to come. Many of the vintage pieces that we collect today from the seventies were inspired by these designers. If you ever run across and origional piece I would recomend holding onto it, you never know when you will have the opportunity to get an item like that again.

True Colors – the Vintage Denim Jean Jacket

Jean Jackets

This month we are disusing the influence of denim on our culture. It is hard to talk about denim without talking about the denim jacket. The denim jacket has been a wardrobe staple for workers since the early 1900’s when the first jean jacket was produced by the Levi Strauss Co. Their main invention the “Blue Jeans” found great success among the ranchers and miners and it didn’t take long for Strauss to realize that the new pants needed a jacket to go along with them.

Rumor has it that the first jean jacket was invented back in 1873 but did they not go into mass production until 1905 and it became an instant classic.

A few years ago Levi’s had a competition to locate the earliest denim jacket produces by the company in the Unites States. Apparently the winner turned in a jacket that was created in 1910 at a Levi’s factory in San Francisco, California. The jacket sold for $2,000 to vintage clothing collectors that were keen to make the article part of their collection.

vintage-cowboy

Some of the newer jackets from the “First Edition” series created in the late 1930’s and early 1940’s can still be located or purchased for anywhere between $200-$500.

Other denim companies like LEE Mercantile and Wrangler also came out with their version of the Jean Jacket.  Some of the older railroad denim jackets created by LEE that were used by railroad workers can be found at various vintage clothing shops or on ebay auctions.

Jean Jackets in Pop-culture

Levi Jackets in Style

I am sure that there are not very many wardrobes that a jean jacket has not been part of at one time or another. From the 1950’s through the 1980’s the jean jacket was used to show the rebellious side of ones nature.

jean vest

Every subculture has found away to adapt denim jackets to their genre, from punkers to prep’s and cowboys to hippies, jean jackets are used to represent one’s true colors.

Today, teeny-bopper stars in Hollywood rock their jean jackets as much as the metal head on sunset strip.

denim-jacket-fashion-trend

ww.fashionfame.com

The popularity of denim jackets fades in an out over the decades but it seems the trend is coming back again stronger than ever.

Celebrities and rock-stars alike have their pictures taken everyday wearing some variety of a jean jacket in it’s entirety or with the sleeves cut off turning into a vest.  A vintage blue jean jacket is very much in demand now, with many buyers for vintage clothing store stocking their shelves with a range of sizes and styles. This clothing is not only worn by metal heads now, but is now very much in favor by fashion conscious people as well.

Now I leave you with a girl and her jacket…

Ugly Sweater Holiday Parties

Winter Vintage Party Outerwear

Holiday Party Season: This season don’t miss out on hosting or sponsoring a few winter parties through your vintage shop. Each year the ugly sweater and funky winter outerwear parties have been popping up all over the place. Not just at fun bars and private parties but at workplace functions, fraternity parties and more.

Don’t be left in the cold!

How to take advantage of Holiday Sales by Sponsoring Parties!

wholesale ugly sweatersSend out an email, put up a sign in your shop and tell your employees to get the word out to all of your customers that your SHOP is the place to go get outfitted for these parties. Don’t be afraid to offer discount codes to group events or specific parties. To do this all you have to do inform party hosts to mention your shop and discount in their party invites or digital Evite’s. It is that simple!

With Retail Mark-ups being some of the highest in the industry it is easy to improve your bottom line this holiday season!

 

Dust Factory Vintage Faux Fur Wholesale are on sale for $16 a jacket online now when purchasing a pack of 12.

Follow Us to  Order Vintage Faux Fur Wholesale for your Store Today!

Dust Factory Vintage Ski Sweaters Wholesale are on sale for $10 a sweater online now when purchasing a pack of 12.

Follow Us to Order Vintage Ski Sweaters!

Offers Valid for a limited time, or while supplies last. If you are outside of the USA you may be unable to process an order through our Online warehouse , FEAR NOT!! If you are having difficulty with the Online warehouse, you can always  email an order into an account representative and they will get back to you with availability and freight rates. . It is that Easy!

Men’s Vintage Clothing Merchandising Tips

Merchandising vintage clothing can get a little tricky if you want to maximize the your return on your investment.  Most women who work in a vintage clothing store know how to merchandise a mannequin with women’s clothing but miss a lot of opportunities when they start dressing the men. It is important for product buyers and merchandisers to understand how different items can be grouped together, and displayed.

The following are different groupings to assist buyers and merchandisers


Product mixes :

TOPS 

Army Shirts

Banlons

Mens Disco Shirts

Mens Retro Shirts

Boy Scout Shirts

Sport Shirts

T-Shirts

Guyaberas

Hawaiian Shirts

Tuxedo Shirts

Western Shirts

Flannel Shirts

Three Button Polos

Hippie Shirts

OUTERWEAR 

Light 80s  Jackets

Military Jackets

Field Jackets

Track Jackets

Members Only/80’s

Vintage Suit Coat

Tuxedo Jacket

Work Jacket

Leisure Suit Jacket

Leather Jackets

Denim Jackets

Trench Coats

Sweatshirts

Bajas /Ethnic Wear

Men’s Sweaters

Insulated Jean Jackets

PANTS 

MenPoly Pants

Cords

Mens Jeans – 70s

Levi 501, 517

Boot cut Lee, Levi,

Wrangler Denim

70s Tuxedo Pants

Work Pants

Checkered Poly Pants

Western Poly Pants

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Market Publique Lookbook – Vintage Fashion w/ a Modern Spin

Vintage Fashion
Image Courtesy of http://welcome.marketpublique.com/lookbooks/

Market Publique Lookbook Gives Vintage Fashion a Modern Spin (Photos)

We like to feature some of our favorite websites, photographers, bloggers and others that are as crazy about vintage as we are. When it comes to Vintage Fashion, style and photography we think that Market Publique is doing a great job leading the pack. Thier online website features a great photography collection of carefully put together vintage outfits in their online lookbook. Take a look at these, they are not just hard to fing rare vintage items, but your every day cool vintage fashion.

Founded by Pamela Castillo, Market Publique brings together a community of buyers and sellers to champion vintage fashion. When it comes to shopping online, photographs mean everything and they do it better than well; their look books breath life–and style–into older clothing, giving them a modern spin

Vintage Fashion

Image Courtesy of http://welcome.marketpublique.com/lookbooks/

Read more over at Market Publique’s blog. http://blog.marketpublique.com/
Check out their great look books at http://welcome.marketpublique.com/lookbooks/

 

Vintage Jean Shorts

Vintage Jean Shorts

Vintage High Waisted Denim Jean Shorts have been rather common among some of the more hipster crowds over the past few seasons. As with everything in the fashion conundrum, these same shorts are starting to make big comeback among some of the more trendy shoppers.

Some of us feel that it is about time, the low-cut look for jeans on women has pretty much run it’s course, and rightfully so. This year everyone from department stores to pseudo cool hipster shops like Urban Outfitters will be carrying a collection of different versions of these high waisted denim shorts for their female clientele. Many of the brand designers for these shorts have gone to the racks of vintage clothing stores for inspiration on how to make the perfect pair. The perfect pair to them is a design that will look and feel exactly like an old pair of vintage jeans.

vintage jeans

The thing to remember is that you do not have to run to your local department store to purchase a great pair of vintage jean shorts, all that you have to do is visit your closet or local vintage store. Find a pair of vintage jeans that looks good on you,  then take them home and cut them to fit. It is that easy.

Summer-Fashion-Shorts

Click Here if you would lime to order Vintage Jean Shorts for your store

Image Sources: LifebyIda & RunwayDaily


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